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Bun Cha Hanoi 26

Commentaires sur Cours de cuisine vietnamienne à l’Appartement créatif (Paris 20) par jlemeitour

by jlemeitour @ Commentaires pour La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Bonjour, j'attends le programme de Mars ! On est le 26, à quelle heure allez-vous le publier ? Merci

Fun Things to Do in Changi Airport Whether You’re A Local or Tourist

by Joyce Khoh @ TripZilla Magazine

Cruise promotion packages

by paloma @ Paloma Cruises Official Website: Discounted Cruise Deals in Halong Bay

Paloma Cruise offers you Halong Bay cruise deals and daily Hanoi-Halong tours at special price. It is an amazing opportunity for you to experience the highlight part of your trip in Vietnam and witness all of the major points of this unique location. Our cruise combines with 3 stars hotels in Hanoi. They are located … Continue reading Cruise promotion packages

The post Cruise promotion packages appeared first on Paloma Cruises Official Website: Discounted Cruise Deals in Halong Bay.

On the road in Vietnam

by noreply@blogger.com (Tabitha) @ The City That Never Sleeps In

This post was first published on Crikey

The Vietnamese spend so much time on their motorbikes I expect that eventually they will evolve into two-wheeled centaurs.

If you pitted a 40-kilogram, stiletto-wearing Vietnamese girl against a burly Aussie bikie in a test of motorcycling skill, I know who my money would be on. But I’m not going to say it, in case I get shot.

But say the test of motorcycling skill was being held out of town, and you had to take a long, bumpy bus ride with the contestants to get there, for the love of God, sit next to the bikie.

The Vietnamese ride through the market, never getting off their bikes even as they prod the produce and haggle over the price of pomelos. They’ll swathe their steeds in swinging bags of meat and fruit and eggs, then drive to a roadside food stall where, like a lo-fi drive-thru, a bread roll with pâté, or a little crème caramel, can be bagged up and hooked over their handlebars, without them ever having to leave their seat.

On their motorbikes they can smoke, and send text messages, and carry a brimming bowl of noodle soup one-handed. Probably all at the same time. Children do their homework riding pillion, and toddlers fall asleep while standing up, wedged between their parents’ legs, their head resting on the handlebars.

But because the Vietnamese pretty much drive out of the birth canal on two wheels, they miss out on a formative experience we take for granted: adapting to four-wheeled transport. As a result, no long-haul bus ride in Vietnam is complete without at least half the passengers vomiting into plastic bags, tying those bags up, then flinging them out the window throughout the entirety of the journey. It’s a case of projectile vomit turned vomit projectiles.

These little exploding parcels of spew litter the highways of Vietnam. So, say you are going to watch this test of motorcycling skill on a motorbike that’s travelling behind the contestants’ bus, then keep a wide, wide berth. Unless you want to receive a high-speed bag o’ vom in your face.

Just as the Vietnamese are, on the whole, inexperienced car passengers, they’re also inexperienced car drivers. This is changing at an incredible rate, with growing wealth resulting in more and more Vietnamese people buying their first car, and taking their first driving lesson.

Hanoi is not the ideal place to earn your driving stripes. The streets are narrow, and already filled almost to capacity with motorbikes. The learner drivers of Hanoi travel at a trepidatious crawl, as if they too are transporting brimming bowls of noodle soup, and maybe they are. They go at speeds so slow that I can easily overtake them on my bicycle at little more than a dawdle.

Taxi drivers are often learners themselves, shuddering along in third gear at speeds that barely make the speedometer twitch. Once, late at night, I’m pretty sure Nathan and I were the inaugural customers of one taxi driver. With his emergency lights and high beams on, we crawled along the deserted street for a few blocks. Then the windows all fogged up; the driver panicked, mounted the curb, and said “Okay!” as if we’d just arrived at our destination, and everything was completely under control.

The all-too-experienced motorcyclists take advantage of the lumbering learners, swarming around them in all directions at intersections, as if the car is merely a fixed obstacle, which can be avoided like a traffic cone.

But there are more cars on the road every day, the result of a furious upward mobility that will, eventually, lead to a traffic standstill when simply no more cars can fit. Vomit missiles will become a thing of the past, and so will all the learner drivers, but no-one will be going anywhere.

Các mẫu hình vẽ kem bơ đẹp xuất sắc năm Mậu Tuất cho bánh thạch rau câu

by editor @ Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Nếu ai đã từng thử qua món bánh “song kiếm hợp bích” giữa thạch rau câu và kem bơ ắt hẳn không thể quên những hình thù ngộ nghĩnh, đáng yêu được làm từ kem bơ béo ngậy nổi lên chiếc bánh thạch rau câu thơm lừng, mát lịm. Đã bao giờ bạn nghe tới […]

The post Các mẫu hình vẽ kem bơ đẹp xuất sắc năm Mậu Tuất cho bánh thạch rau câu appeared first on Tâm Sự Gia Đình.

Hanoi vs Ho Chi Minh City: Which Vietnam City Is Right For You?

by Bruno B. @ Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

Struggling making a decision between Hanoi vs Ho Chi Minh for your upcoming trip to Vietnam? In this article I’m comparing both cities in terms of food, safety, places to visit and overall vibe for you to decide its overall travel potential. Which one is the right for you? Vietnam is not the easiest of […]

The post Hanoi vs Ho Chi Minh City: Which Vietnam City Is Right For You? appeared first on Geeky Explorer | Travel smart. Travel smart!

Bún Thịt Nướng Recipe (Vietnamese Grilled Pork & Rice Noodles) - HungryHuy.com

Bún Thịt Nướng Recipe (Vietnamese Grilled Pork & Rice Noodles) - HungryHuy.com


HungryHuy.com

This is love in a bowl. If you’ve had bún thịt nướng you know what I’m talking about. You have your sweet bits, sour bits, caramelization, some crunch, and aromatic herbs in a single, colorful arrangement. Depending in which restaurant you order your grilled pork with noodles (bún thịt nướng), you’ll find that it’s presented …

Báo điện tử VTV News - Đài Truyền Hình Việt Nam | VTV.vn

Báo điện tử VTV News - Đài Truyền Hình Việt Nam | VTV.vn


BAO DIEN TU VTV

Mời độc giả đón đọc tin tức thời sự về chính trị, kinh tế, đời sống, xã hội, pháp luật, thể thao, văn hoá, giải trí... Xem truyền hình trực tuyến, TV Online các kênh VTV trên Internet.

Hanoi - September 26th to October 2nd 2016

Hanoi - September 26th to October 2nd 2016


What Made You Happy Today?

From Bac Ha, we went back to Lao Cai to take the train to Hanoi. We did 200 km in 9 hours…! But I guess it was more comfortable than being moved from one side to another in the bus driving fa…

26 Reasons to Fall in Love with Hanoi

26 Reasons to Fall in Love with Hanoi


TripZilla

These reasons will surely make you want to book a flight to Hanoi right now.

Par : Sophie Tofu

by Sophie Tofu @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Mémé de Haiphong nous a appris au barbecue au charbon de bois :) avec les petites grilles qui vont bien venues tout droit de Hanoi :) Mais il est vrai que je l'ai mangé à Hanoi avec le nuoc mam tiède très dilué et les boulettes. Je vais cette fois tenter ta recette typique de Hanoi ! Merci Miss Tam !!

Lisbon 3-Day Itinerary: What to See In Europe’s Hipster Capital

by Bruno B. @ Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

This Lisbon 3-day itinerary is ideal for anyone visiting for the first time the portuguese capital. It’s packed with insider advice of what’s REALLY worth to do and hipster tips to see the major sights. Bem-vindo a Lisboa! Oh Lisbon. The city oozing the million-dollar combination of tradition, charm and modernism. The alluring culture, the […]

The post Lisbon 3-Day Itinerary: What to See In Europe’s Hipster Capital appeared first on Geeky Explorer | Travel smart. Travel smart!

Jewel Changi Airport 2019: Indoor Waterfalls, Treetop Walks, Sky Nets & More

by TripZilla @ TripZilla Magazine

Phản hồi cho Xót xa lời kể của người mẹ có con trai 6 tháng tuổi bị sùi mào gà sau khi cắt bao quy đầu bởi Dương Bích Lan

by Dương Bích Lan @ phản hồi cho Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Thành công rồi … Chim Ku Đậu Thành công rồi … Các mẹ ơi …! Tôi quá vất vả với Chim con : “ Cây hai mini “ của Ku Đậu 3,5 tuổi . Nào là : - Vệ sinh , nào bôi thuốc ( Các mẹ mách gì – làm nấy ) - Vậy mà chim con vẫn ngứa ,vẫn sưng từng đợt ,đái chậm ,đầu Chim phồng to lúc đái - Có lần sưng vù ,mọng chin phải vào viện … Bác sĩ khuyên phải cắt Da bao quy đầu vì quá hẹp không thể nong được - Làm sao đây : cắt thì thương con đau .. lại gây mê - gây meo nguy hiểm lắm ..Để thì không biết bao giờ mới khỏi mà nghe nói lấy vợ là khó .. khăn …. nhé - Ông xã đi công tác biền biệt … Chán.. .Hỏi thì bảo Tùy mẹ … - Rồi may … một hôm trà chanh ,kẹo mút với mấy con bạn .. phàn nàn về chuyện Chim Cò …Nó mách nước cho …,quả là thần hiệu - Gặp Ngay Bs Vương Hàng Bột ( 0912863699) : Mọi chuyện sẽ như ý … Con tao Hẹp chim nhiều nơi bất lực,cứ bảo phải cắt mổ ,tới đây là OK ,bây giờ “ cây hai mini “ như mới ..hết đau ,hết ngứa .. - Mừng lắm : Được bs Khám & giải thích chi tiết ..dễ hiểu ,tôi đồng ý chữa ngay …và mọi chuyện như ý : Sau ít phút – Con nằm chơi Game điện thoại - Không đau – Không chảy tí máu nào – Xong luôn – nhiều chất bẩn được lấy ra – đầu chim lộ nguyên hình long lanh …như quả nho tươi ( thật không thể tin được ! đẹp mỹ mãn ) - Siêu kỹ thuật (nhanh khỏi – không đau ) ,chăm sóc chu đáo, Tốn một chút cũng phải các mẹ ah - Thành công rồi – tôi đã mở đầu chim con rất dễ dàng , làm vệ sinh sạch sẽ chẳng còn đau ngứa ,nhiều lúc bảo cháu cũng tự làm được … 2 mẹ con cười khúc khích … Ông bố đứng xem và cổ vũ …vậy là hết lo âu …Chim Ku như ý :Tuyệt chiêu - quá siêu .Thank for Dr. Vượng cafechon12@gmail.com (Dương Bích Lan - Rmith University Vietnam )

President pays Tet visits to outstanding intellectuals in Hanoi

by robert @ Talk Vietnam

President Tran Dai Quang visits and extends Tet greetings to Prof. Dr. Nguyen Khoa Son. (Photo: VNA) Hanoi (VNA) – President Tran Dai Quang visited and extended Tet greetings to several senior intellectuals at their residence in Hanoi on February 12, or the 27th day of the last lunar month, wishing them a happy new […]

Commentaires sur Bún Thịt Nướng (Vermicelles de riz au porc grillé à la citronnelle) par Stephen

by Stephen @ Commentaires pour La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Bonjour, Superbe recette. Est-il possible de faire la marinade de viande la veille pour le soir suivant ? Merci pour votre site, Stephen

Bun Rieu from Phuong Nga 2

by Kirk K @ mmm-yoso!!!

I am forever indebted to all the folks who send me recommendations. In the comments section of my revisits post on Suppanee and Pho Xpress, "Elle" asked if I had tried the Bun Rieu at the newest location of Phuong...

Bún Thang – Vietnamese Noodle Soup with Chicken, Pork, & Egg

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

What Is Bún Thang? My knowledge of the Vietnamese language is about on par with my grandma’s English, so this gives us lots of opportunities to learn from each other. She watches Viet news and Korean dramas which have a surprising amount of English in them. The latest term I explained to her was “poker face” hah! […]

The post Bún Thang – Vietnamese Noodle Soup with Chicken, Pork, & Egg appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

The “Bun Cha!” Heroes of Xuan Dieu

The “Bun Cha!” Heroes of Xuan Dieu


Our Man in Hanoi

Working from home more than ever, if I eat lunch then it’s frequentally at the Xuan Dieu bun cha place. It being deep in the heart of Tayville this is probably the most whitey patronised stre…

A roundup of Hanoi markets

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

Hanoi’s a city full of markets worth exploring. To begin with, food markets can be found all over town – despite the growth of the supermarket, most shopping is still conducted at local wet markets and neighbourhood shops, so there are plenty to experience. Probably the most accessible is the market along Phung Hung Street....

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The post A roundup of Hanoi markets appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

Hang Ga Street

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

Among the 12 Eastern zodiac signs used in Viet Nam, the Rooster is the least fierce of them all. Despite this, the rooster remains the only one to have one of Ha Noi’s 36 old-quarter streets named after it. That street is Hang Ga (chicken vendors) and other than a small alley called Lo Lon...

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The post Hang Ga Street appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

“Hanoi 36 Streets”

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

As the oldest continuously developed area of Vietnam, Hanoi’s Old Quarter has a history that spans 2,000 years and represents the eternal soul of the city. Located between the Lake of the Restored Sword, the Long Bien Bridge, a former city rampart, and a citadel wall, the Old Quarter started as a snake and alligator-infested...

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The post “Hanoi 36 Streets” appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

A Blind Bakery Worker Tells His Story

by Catherine @ HOTTABLE

We speak with Tran Quoc Hoan, a delightfully chatty customer service officer at Donkey Bakery and one of its longest service team members.

The post A Blind Bakery Worker Tells His Story appeared first on HOTTABLE.

Ultimate Travel Guide to Hanoi, Vietnam - Drew Binsky

Ultimate Travel Guide to Hanoi, Vietnam - Drew Binsky


Drew Binsky

I lived in Hanoi for 4 months and I absolutely love this city! In this blog post, find out my best tips for what to do, eat and see in Vietnam's capital!

Get a Chance to Win an All-Expense Paid Trip for Two to Japan, Maldives, South Korea, and Taiwan With Paymaya’s Travel Blowout Promo

by Melo Villareal @ Out of Town Blog

Out of Town Blog
Get a Chance to Win an All-Expense Paid Trip for Two to Japan, Maldives, South Korea, and Taiwan With Paymaya’s Travel Blowout Promo

Paymaya’s Travel Blowout Promo Paying with Paymaya is not just easy, it can also take you to different parts of the globe as the country’s pioneer and leader in digital payments will reward customers with a chance to experience global travel destination through its PayMaya Travel Blowout promo which will run from February 1 to […]

Get a Chance to Win an All-Expense Paid Trip for Two to Japan, Maldives, South Korea, and Taiwan With Paymaya’s Travel Blowout Promo
Melo Villareal

Bun Rieu from Phuong Nga 2

Bun Rieu from Phuong Nga 2


mmm-yoso!!!

I am forever indebted to all the folks who send me recommendations. In the comments section of my revisits post on Suppanee and Pho Xpress, "Elle" asked if I had tried the Bun Rieu at the newest location of Phuong...

TCU Bun Cha - Taher, Inc. Food Service

TCU Bun Cha - Taher, Inc. Food Service


Taher, Inc. Food Service

Bun cha - Chef Chris Murray got the idea for his bun cha recipe during a recent trip to Hanoi, Vietnam. - (Grace Webb/Lonsdale News Review)

Bar Bodega - Happy Hour and Lunch

by Kirk K @ mmm-yoso!!!

The Missus really wanted a change of pace; yes, Et Voila is on about every other week, though mostly for Happy Hour (I need to do an updated post), ditto Tribute Pizza. Our last couple of visits to Tiger Tiger...

Hang Bac Street

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

Hang Bac Street is now located Hang Bac ward, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi. With 0,5 km of length. At the head of street interact with Hang Ngang Street, Hang Dao Street, Hang Bo Street. View of East: near Tran Quang Khai & dike side of Red River Referring to the contents of the stele inscriptions...

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The post Hang Bac Street appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

Bún Chả Hà Nội 26

Bún Chả Hà Nội 26


TNH

A very popular lunch restaurant serving the famous Hanoian lunch staple, Bún Chả (Hanoi Style Vermicelli with Grilled Pork).

Par : Elisa

by Elisa @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Rien que le nom bun chà, et j'en ai l'eau à la bouche. C'est un plat tellement rafraîchissant et plein de bonheur. Mon beau père fait griller le porc sur un barbecue électrique. Mais j'imagine que le mieux c'est le barbecue au bois. Encore faut il pouvoir. Il faut absolument que je teste moi même cette recette. Elle n'a pas l'air compliquée. Et c'est tellement bon!!

Jewel Changi Airport 2019: Indoor Waterfalls, Treetop Walks, Sky Nets & More

by TripZilla @ TripZilla Magazine

Bún Bò Huế Recipe – Spicy Beef & Pork Noodle Soup

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

Bún bò Huế is a hidden Vietnamese gem that has yet to “make it” in mainstream American cuisine. It’s a rich and spicy soup with deep layers of flavor. This Central Vietnamese soup is paired with tender slices of beef and pork, then topped with lots of fresh herbs. Phở has made its way in and has grown popular quickly, so why […]

The post Bún Bò Huế Recipe – Spicy Beef & Pork Noodle Soup appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Vietnam wants closer defence training cooperation with India

by robert @ Uncategorized – Talk Vietnam

Senior Lieutenant General Pham Ngoc Minh, Deputy Chief of the General Staff of the VPA, made the affirmation at a reception in Hanoi on May 29 for Major General Anil Dere, who is leading a delegation from the Indian National Defence University to Vietnam. Cooperation in personnel training is one of the ways to promote […]

For hire: one blogger, with some wear and tear

by noreply@blogger.com (Tabitha) @ The City That Never Sleeps In

This post first appeared in AsiaLife HCMC.

Many expats worry about how their time spent overseas will affect their employability when they return home. Fear not! The skills you’ve learned in Vietnam are totally transferable. You just need to position them in the right way. 

“I have advanced and adaptable communication skills”

What this means is you can act out, charades-style, complex medical afflictions for the pharmacist (“Two words, four syllables… That’s right: vaginal thrush!”), and, using absolutely no words, acquire exactly the counterfeit medications you need. Indeed, your non-verbal skills are so advanced that you can convey entire sentences just using your eyes. It only takes one narrow-eyed glare to say, “If this pirated DVD copy of Game of Thrones is not of superior quality, mark my words, I will be right back here to have your guts for garters.”

“I have demonstrated experience in following complex procedures, and applying specific policies and guidelines”

Do you know the correct, Vietnamese-approved order in which to add the raw ingredients to your hotpot? Yes? Really? You’re not tempted to add the noodles too soon? Well, there is no more complex procedure than that. You’re a total pro.

“I have experience in research and analysis across a broad range of fields”

Well, you might not leave Vietnam an expert in its history or language or culture, but I bet if I asked you for the nearest store that sells cheese, or where to go for the cheapest beer in a 100-metre radius, you would be all over that shit. You are an expert: you’re an expat expert. And that doesn’t happen overnight. It takes years of strategic research and analysis to find the closest cheese and cheapest beer.

“I am financially adept and have considerable experience in profit-and-loss calculations and business negotiations”

Finances? Pffft, piece of cake! To be more precise, piece of cake you got for half-price because you found a baby rat in it. Score! Your entire life is a profit-and-loss calculation. Sure, it’s running at a pretty constant loss of about 40 percent because of your poor bargaining techniques and enormous nose, but there’s a gecko living in your kitchen who you’ve named “Gordon Gecko” which is totally the kind of reference that only a hard-hitting business mogul like yourself would get.

“I can interpret and analyse complex and ambiguous situations, generating appropriate recommendations and solutions”

You sure can. For example, when your neighbour asks you “Do you have children yet?” you employ in depth analysis to understand this to mean: “You will surely die ALONE and BARREN.” Your solution is to rub your belly and pretend you’re pregnant when really you’ve just eaten too much of that chè with the rainbow jelly in it.

“I thrive in a fast-paced, dynamic environment”

Umm, every time you use your hairdryer, blue sparks come flying out at you from the wall socket. I think you can handle working in a “dynamic” office.

“Challenging situations bring out the best in me”

For you, a challenging situation is like a shot of rice wine made from rotting goat’s penis: it MAKES YOU STRONG. Sure, it could also make you vomit into your handbag all the way to the Family Medical Practice, but whatever, that’s still not the worst in you, is it.

“I have advanced problem-solving skills”

It only took you twelve months to work out which type of Vinamilk is the one with no sugar. You are basically an ace code-cracker.

“I operate to the highest levels of personal integrity and ethical standards”

You wipe your chopsticks with a napkin before you use them. That totally counts.


And just like that, your time in Vietnam reaps dividends. If you need a reference, just send them to me. No-one’s going to call a referee in Vietnam anyway.

Par : Gérard

by Gérard @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Vous pouvez manger un excellent Bun Cha au restaurant Thanh Long à Montpellier

Hanoi food tour: grazing, Vietnamese style

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

From noodles, to crispy pancakes and birds cooked in Coke cans, Natalie Paris takes a walking tour to discover some of Hanoi’s best street food “As a road user there’s an understanding when crossing traffic. I pick my moment but then when I’m on the road I don’t even look.” Mark, our street food guide...

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The post Hanoi food tour: grazing, Vietnamese style appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

Bun cha Hanoi - les meilleures adresses pour les meilleurs Bun cha Hanoi

Bun cha Hanoi - les meilleures adresses pour les meilleurs Bun cha Hanoi


Blog voyage Vietnam mis à jour toutes les semaines

Bun cha Hanoi est une spécialité bien connue de Hanoi. Le président Barack Obama l'a dégusté au restaurant de Huong Lien, au 26 rue Le Van Huu lors de son..

How to appreciate Vietnam... while you're still here

by noreply@blogger.com (Tabitha) @ The City That Never Sleeps In

This post first appeared as a column in AsiaLIFE Ho Chi Minh City magazine.

When I arrived in Vietnam, filled with notions of my imminent cultural assimilation and fluency in the native tongue, I looked at most expats who had been here for a while with outright disdain. Why had they moved to Vietnam, I wondered, to socialize only with other foreigners and eat pizza?

I am now that expat. I’m probably eating pizza right now. And it tastes like mozzarella and self-loathing.

While I have all kinds of excellent, convincing excuses for why I’ve become the exact stereotype that I so scorned, if I could have my time again, I’d do it differently. For example, rather than just learning the Vietnamese expression for “I am studying Vietnamese”, I would actually, you know, study Vietnamese.

It’s not that I think my life here is in any way deficient. It’s more that when I meet newly-arrived expats now, I can’t stand being on the other end of those disdainful looks. “You’re looking at your future, Sonny Jim”, I say. And then I take a swig of whiskey to hide the pain.

I have noticed another kind of expat regret too. It’s the one where the expat leaves Vietnam and then posts Facebook status updates from their home country like “Wish I was drinking a cà phê sữa đá right now!!!” or “Missing my motorbike ride to work!!! :(” Exclamation marks are compulsory; sad face emoticons are optional. 

That’s odd, I think to myself. I seem to recall that very same expat, when they were still in Vietnam, whinging about how they couldn’t get a decent coffee in this country, and how their motorbike commute was a daily near-death experience.

And so like the circle of life, and the turning seasons, and karma, and the cosmos, and that Justin Timberlake song “What Goes Around Comes Around”, I, the disdained, get to disdain again. Read my contemptuous lips: I will not become one of those rose-coloured regretters who use too many exclamation marks!!!

I’m not going to achieve this by being down on Vietnam. This column might make me sound mean spirited, but I’m not that mean spirited.

Instead, I decided to email everyone I know who had left the country and ask them, from the perspective afforded by being back in their homeland, what they now missed about Vietnam. I figured this was a way of averting the you-don’t-know-what-you’ve-got-til-it’s-gone syndrome and ensuring I appreciate the best things about Vietnam, while I’m actually still here.

The results are now in from my extremely scientific poll. And the number one most missed thing about Vietnam is the energy: the non-stop action, the excitement, the busy streets. 

My first response to this was “Pffffft! Won’t catch me missing what you’ve charmingly described as energy but which we all know means a chaotic, frazzling free-for-all.” Because I guess I am quite mean spirited.

But this is the exactly the point. In a case of the grass always being greener, when you’re in Vietnam you pine for footpaths you can actually walk on, an empty park to run through, and just some peace and quiet godammit. When you return home and get free access to all those things, it’s actually quite boring. The bustle of Vietnam, the unpredictability, the chaos, it all provides constant stimulation and invigoration. And you’ll miss it when it’s gone.

So now when I’m stuck in traffic, wedged between a bicycle vendor selling bánh rán and a motorbike laden with road-tripping chickens, the sun’s blazing down, and I just want to get home, I try to think to myself, at least it’s not boring. It might be frazzling, but at least it’s dazzling. That’s my new motto.

And the other responses to my survey? What else should I be better appreciating? Well, the spontaneity of social life, the lack of responsibilities and societal expectations, and the bountiful free time; the affordability of going out, the luxury of a housekeeper and the cheap travel opportunities; the storms, the fruit, the geckos, the colour, the flowers, the street food, the markets, and the trà đá.

When you look at it, you actually experience most items on this list in just your average, run-of-the-mill day here. This can mean only one thing: you should appreciate every single day in this country while you still can.

Bun Cha Ha Noi | 26/1A Le Thanh Ton, Ben Nghe, District 1, Ho Chi Minh City

Bun Cha Ha Noi | 26/1A Le Thanh Ton, Ben Nghe, District 1, Ho Chi Minh City


Atexpats

26/1A Le Thanh Ton, Ben Nghe, District 1, Ho Chi Minh City 84 8 38275843 1 1 1

Restaurants Near Mido Spa, Hanoi - Skyscanner

Restaurants Near Mido Spa, Hanoi - Skyscanner


Trip by Skyscanner

Looking for restaurants near Mido Spa? Find 112 nearby restaurants in Hanoi, Vietnam visited by over 2,487 people.

Vietnam Tips And Tricks: 26 Key Things To Know Before Your Trip

by Bruno B. @ Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

This list of useful tips and tricks of Vietnam is mostly intended for first-time visitors but it can help anyone achieve a safe and worry-free travel. It should alert you for common mistakes and prepare you for traveling to one of the most amazing countries on Earth. I mean it. Not gonna lie: Vietnam is […]

The post Vietnam Tips And Tricks: 26 Key Things To Know Before Your Trip appeared first on Geeky Explorer | Travel smart. Travel smart!

Food street in the center Saigon | ALO Travel Asia

Food street in the center Saigon | ALO Travel Asia


ALO Travel Asia

Ben Thanh market: Lunch stopover on shopping day in Ben Thanh market Hue traditional food: Enter Gate 7 on Phan Chu Trinh street, you can see this court on the left with the board ” BANH BEO HUE”. Only $1 for a mixing dish here. The mixing dish include banh beo, banh bot loc, banh khoai, banh it, cha Hue and fish sauce, dried shrimp topping. Sweet soup dessert – Che Be ($1/glass): a 40 year old stall... read more

Bánh tôm chiên (galettes de crevettes frites)

by Miss Tâm @ La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

« À la sortie des cours, je courais avec mes camarades vers la marchande assise sur le trottoir au coin de la rue. Un attroupement se formait autour d’elle fasciné par ses galettes de crevettes frites. La pâte à frire blanche … Lire la suite

Cet article Bánh tôm chiên (galettes de crevettes frites) est apparu en premier sur La kitchenette de Miss Tâm.

Commentaires sur Cours de cuisine vietnamienne à l’Appartement créatif (Paris 20) par Julien ALEXANDRE

by Julien ALEXANDRE @ Commentaires pour La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Quelle convivialité!!! On se sent pratiquement chez soi grace à l'accueil charmant de Minh Tam... Et quelle recette! Le poulet coco-citronnelle est un pur délice, digne d'un plat gastronomique... Respect des aliments, de l'hygiène, et partage de son savoir faire, tel est la ligne directrice de notre chef... Un tres bon moment partagé en famille... A recommander!!!

Review: A Wonderful Cultural Experience of TEH DAR

by Quynh Anh @ ALO Travel Asia

Last Friday, 4 members of our team had been invited to watch the Teh Dar show – an art performance depicts the lifestyle and culture of South West Vietnamese – an another version of the famous Ah Oh Show by Lune Production.   Teh Dar is described as a version of A O Show which features an exotic Vietnamese tribes life with the untold stories from the mountains and jungles. The performance exhibits an enchanting stage craft... read more

The post Review: A Wonderful Cultural Experience of TEH DAR appeared first on ALO Travel Asia.

Bun Cha and Nem Cua Be: Eat in Hanoi like a Local - Out of Town Blog

Bun Cha and Nem Cua Be: Eat in Hanoi like a Local - Out of Town Blog


Out of Town Blog

Try Bun Cha! – A Facebook comment I got from Vien Cortes who lived in Hanoi for 5 years. Since our Tourist Bus is WiFi equipped, I immediately asked Duc, our efficient tour guide where can I find Bun Cha and he said he will try to bring us to one of the best “Hole in …

Par : Miss Tâm

by Miss Tâm @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Merci de votre commentaire. Les recettes au pays sont toujours meilleures qu'à l'étranger. En effet, au barbecue, les grillades sont meilleures. Mais à la poêle, les boulettes de viande pour le Bun Cha sont absolument honorables, voire délicieuses. En avez-vous déjà goûté de cette façon ? Merci de votre visite ! À bientôt.

"Bun Cha" Hanoi - Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

"Bun Cha" Hanoi - Rising Dragon Palace Hotel


Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

The author of a Vietnamese cuisine guidebook said “I discovered new taste buds that I didn’t know I had.” I think that is the most accurate description about Vietnamese cuisine. As an avid eater, I was really excited about a month trip to Vietnam. And yes, I did eat a lot. Spring rolls, Pho and... Continue Reading

Phản hồi cho Con bị não úng thủy, cha và nội nhẫn tâm bỏ rơi bởi Tomato

by Tomato @ phản hồi cho Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Làm ơn để lại thông tin ủng hộ cho cháu bé

Bangkok’s Chatuchak Market is Going Cashless this June

by Lydia Lee @ TripZilla Magazine

Fun Things to Do in Changi Airport Whether You’re A Local or Tourist

by Joyce Khoh @ TripZilla Magazine

US STOCKS-Wall St strives to bounce back from worst week in two years

by robert @ Talk Vietnam

By 8:26 a.m. ET (1326 GMT), Dow e-minis were up 288 points, S&P 500 e-minis were up 30 points, Nasdaq 100 e-minis were up 69 points. The benchmark S&P 500 index closed up 1.5 percent on Friday (Feb.9), but still ended the week nearly nine percent below its all-time high on Jan. 26 as investors […]

Review: Annam Restaurant, Wellington

Review: Annam Restaurant, Wellington


Stuff

Curry, calamari and some seriously fresh bun cha.

Hanoi’s best boutique hotels

by Quynh Anh @ ALO Travel Asia

Hanoi might be famous for its impenetrable walls of Vespas, but the city isn’t quite as chaotic as it’s chalked up to be. Wandering about the capital of Vietnam, travelers expecting a wild urban adventure might be pleasantly surprised to also find quiet, leafy streets and hidden coffee shops. One of the most charming aspects of the city is the plethora of restored neoclassical and Gothic architecture — a holdover from the city’s stint as a... read more

The post Hanoi’s best boutique hotels appeared first on ALO Travel Asia.

About Dong Xuan market

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

Dong Xuan market is at the West end of Hanoi Old quarter, surrounded by Dong Xuan street Hang Khoai street and Cau Dong street. History Although located in the heart of the Old Quarters, the market is fairly young compared with the surrounding streets. It used to be an empty lot in front of Huyen...

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The post About Dong Xuan market appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

IBiero: A Craft Beer with a Vietnamese Twist

by Peter Cowan @ HOTTABLE

Hanoi’s IBiero Craft Beer Station is one of the latest additions to the capital’s craft beer scene, and with a forward think focus on local drinkers, the future is bright.

The post IBiero: A Craft Beer with a Vietnamese Twist appeared first on HOTTABLE.

Back on the Bun Cha

Back on the Bun Cha


noodlepie

Apologies to regulars, but there's another Bun cha posting coming your way. Noodlepie has a loose eye on finding the best pho in town, but if I was based up in Hanoi I would transfer that focus to the lunchtime dish - Bun cha. "We've heard all this before Pieman, give us something new for chrissakes," I hear my lone reader cry. Tough. It's my favourite Vietnamese dish and it's rare enough in Saigon for me to realistically try the majority of places serving pukka pork balls during my stint here. We've covered the Ly Tu Trong and Tran Cao...

WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO VISIT VIETNAM?

by Quynh Anh @ ALO Travel Asia

One of the safest and cheapest destinations in Southeast Asia, Vietnam is an incredible year-round destination. Whether you are traveling solo or with friends, this is definitely a place that you wouldn’t want to miss. Below here, we have prepared a detail article for you to know when are the best time to visit each region of our country. Northern Vietnam Hanoi Hanoi has 4 seasons with each season had its own traits of beautiful. Summer... read more

The post WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO VISIT VIETNAM? appeared first on ALO Travel Asia.

Bun Dau Mam Tom: The Smelliest Food in Vietnam And All About It - The Christina's Blog

Bun Dau Mam Tom: The Smelliest Food in Vietnam And All About It - The Christina's Blog


The Christina's Blog

Bun dau mam tom (Vietnamese fermented shrimp paste noodle) may be smelly but it's surely delicious. Read on to find out where you eat this dish.

Non La – Symbol of Vietnamese charm and romance

by Quynh Anh @ ALO Travel Asia

Non la (palm-leaf conical hat) is a traditional symbol of Vietnamese people without the restriction of age, sex or racial distinctions Origin of Non la Like every custom of Vietnam, Non la has its own origin, coming from a legend related to the history of rice growing in Vietnam. The story is about a giant woman from the sky who has protected humankind from a deluge of rain. She wore a hat made of four round shaped... read more

The post Non La – Symbol of Vietnamese charm and romance appeared first on ALO Travel Asia.

Bún chả Hà Nội - Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Bún chả Hà Nội - Tâm Sự Gia Đình


Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Thật thiếu sót nếu gọi tên như vầy, vì chưa đủ vị, nhưng chẳng sao. Chỉ cần là hương thơm tỏa ra từ bếp và rau, bún, nước mắm đã chờ sẵn ở bàn đã đủ cho những cảm xúc ấm áp của Hà Thành Nguyên liệu 300 gram thịt băm 1/2 củ hành tây …

Eating in Hanoi I

Eating in Hanoi I


Gastronomy

After living in Vietnam for over 7 months without traveling north of Hue, I finally made it to Hanoi recently for a business trip. With no appointments on my first day, I was free to tour the city …

Enjoy a Cultural Tet in Central Vietnam: Hue, Da Nang, & Hoi An.

by Phuc Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

The North celebrates the Spring of 2018 with many unique festivals such as the Hai Ba Trung Festival, the beautiful pink peach-blossoms that line the streets, and a slight breeze that is both warming and reminiscent of home. The South, on the other hand, greets Tet with the charming yellow apricot-blossoms and joy in the […]

The post Enjoy a Cultural Tet in Central Vietnam: Hue, Da Nang, & Hoi An. appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

European firms stay positive on Vietnam’s business climate

by robert @ Uncategorized – Talk Vietnam

The index hit 78, seven points below the fourth quarter of 2016, but this does not mean that businesses are under alert or will not continue to explore such a high-potential economy as Vietnam, said EuroCham Chairman Jens Ruebbert. The survey showed most businesses (90%) are either maintaining or increasing their investments in Vietnam, adding […]

Commentaires sur Bananes au lait de coco et perles de tapioca (Chè chuối / Chuối chưng) par Sewey

by Sewey @ Commentaires pour La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Je vais tester ce soir :) En tout cas, un grand merci et bravo parce que ton blog me sauve la vie. J'ai toujours eu l'habitude d'avheter plein de livres de recettes, mais tres souvent decue du resultat (je ne suis pas une super cuisiniere de base). Et la... je tombe sur ton blog ou j'ai deja essaye 5/6 recettes que je refais regulierement, et a chaque fois c'est une tuerie !! Donc un grand merci ! Un livre de prevu peut etre ?

Maximum of 900 guests allowed to visit Son Doong in 2018

by Quynh Anh @ ALO Travel Asia

Oxalis tour operator, the only travel company allowed to organise tours to the well-known Son Doong Cave, in the central province of Quang Binh, officially opened its ticket sales to explore the world’s largest cave for 2018, with a route of four days and three nights. According to Oxalis General Director Nguyen Chau A, his company offered 460 slots in the first sale. This morning, about 250 guests already bought tickets. In 2018, Quang Binh province... read more

The post Maximum of 900 guests allowed to visit Son Doong in 2018 appeared first on ALO Travel Asia.

Why Halong Bay attracts tourists year-round

by paloma @ Paloma Cruises Official Website: Discounted Cruise Deals in Halong Bay

While Halong Bay is often known by its sunny and sparkling image of a summer destination, the scenery of this UNESCO World Heritage Site in winter has a totally different charm that stole the heart of many tourists around the world. This is the reason why Halong Bay attracts tourists year-round, no matter the season and … Continue reading Why Halong Bay attracts tourists year-round

The post Why Halong Bay attracts tourists year-round appeared first on Paloma Cruises Official Website: Discounted Cruise Deals in Halong Bay.

World's best dishes: Bun cha - Discovery

World's best dishes: Bun cha - Discovery


Discovery

IAN PAYNTON travels nearly 6,000 miles from London to Hanoi to find this meaty noodle treat

Jewel Changi Airport 2019: Indoor Waterfalls, Treetop Walks, Sky Nets & More

by TripZilla @ TripZilla Magazine

Hang Thung Street

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

In the old days, on this block inside the Dong Yen gate, barrels were manufactured. The barrels were used for storing and carrying water and fish sauce. The communal house and the temple of the barrel makers’ guild is located at 22 Hang Thung, but is hidden behind newer buildings. The street is shaded by...

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The post Hang Thung Street appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

Nouilles d’Asie : un livre à savourer !

by Miss Tâm @ La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Voilà tout beau, tout chaud arrivé, notre nouveau livre de cuisine Nouilles d’Asie publié aux éditions du Chêne, écrit à six mains avec Chihiro Masui, éminente journaliste et auteure de magnifiques livres gastronomiques (Thés japonais, La cuisine du Japon, Astrance le livre de … Lire la suite

Cet article Nouilles d’Asie : un livre à savourer ! est apparu en premier sur La kitchenette de Miss Tâm.

What’s the Deal with Kombucha?

by Julia Solervicens @ HOTTABLE

If that mouth-watering description hasn’t convinced you yet, many have hailed it to be the ultimate health brew.

The post What’s the Deal with Kombucha? appeared first on HOTTABLE.

The Best Of Siquijor: Itinerary, Tourist Spots and Budget in 2018

by Bruno B. @ Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

This Siquijor travel guide and itinerary has all you need to know to plan your trip to one of the best hidden gems of the Philippines. Dreamy waterfalls, secret tropical beaches and memorable sunsets await you in Siquijor: the island of fire! Siquijor island has been known as land of witchcraft, enchantments and sorcery. So […]

The post The Best Of Siquijor: Itinerary, Tourist Spots and Budget in 2018 appeared first on Geeky Explorer | Travel smart. Travel smart!

Commentaires sur Index Recettes par NGUYEN

by NGUYEN @ Commentaires pour La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Un grand merci Miss Tâm pour la recette de Bun Bo Huê que j'ai appliqué à la lettre pour 10 personnes. Apparament mes convives ont bien apprécié ma soupe.

Review: BBQ with The Pit Barrel Cooker

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

Let’s put this out here front and center. We’re gluttons for good smoked bbq (we’ve had a bbq caterer smoke bbq for 3 parties!) but have always been too intimidated to make it at home—until now. Yes, we’ve spent hours making complex soups such as bun bo hue and other seemingly difficult Vietnamese dishes, but […]

Bangkok’s Chatuchak Market is Going Cashless this June

by Lydia Lee @ TripZilla Magazine

Par : Bérengère

by Bérengère @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Je n'ai pas fait de photos, mais la prochaine fois que je réaliserai ce plat je le photographierai et je t'enverrai les photos. Par contre je réalise le plat non pas avec des nouilles, mais souvent... avec du riz gluant. On se refait pas j'en mets partout j'adore ça.

How To Get From Lisbon Airport to City Center (Without Getting Scammed)

by Bruno B. @ Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

Find out how to conveniently get to some of the most popular places in Lisbon’s city center. First tip: stay away from taxis! Lisbon is one of the most charming capitals in Europe. There are many unique things to do, see and taste here, ensuring you have a memorable time. I recommend that you stay […]

The post How To Get From Lisbon Airport to City Center (Without Getting Scammed) appeared first on Geeky Explorer | Travel smart. Travel smart!

Fun Things to Do in Changi Airport Whether You’re A Local or Tourist

by Joyce Khoh @ TripZilla Magazine

“Bun Cha” Hanoi

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

The author of a Vietnamese cuisine guidebook said “I discovered new taste buds that I didn’t know I had.” I think that is the most accurate description about Vietnamese cuisine. As an avid eater, I was really excited about a month trip to Vietnam. And yes, I did eat a lot. Spring rolls, Pho and...

Continue Reading

The post “Bun Cha” Hanoi appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

Celebrating Vietnamese Lunar New Year In Hanoi – A Comprehensive Tet Guide

by Phuong Thuy @ The Christina's Blog

You might have heard that most businesses close during Tet in Hanoi, and that you won’t find a place to enjoy a slow dinner over the grill, let alone the charms of the city. But take it from a local, don’t worry! This thousand-year-old capital can show you a traditional Tet in Vietnam if you […]

The post Celebrating Vietnamese Lunar New Year In Hanoi – A Comprehensive Tet Guide appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Par : Marie Damas

by Marie Damas @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Mmmmm les boulettes!!!! et le mélange d'herbes merveilleux. J'ai fait la recette avec des herbes prises un peu au hasard, ca ne doit pas être très orthodoxe mais c'était délicieux : coriandre, liserons d'eau, ngo gai (?) et kayeng (?). En revanche j'ai mal estimé le temps de préparation (je le saurai pour la prochaine fois) et j'ai choisi de faire du riz gluant à la vapeur au lieu des vermicelles...... que j'ai lamentablement raté (si, si, c'est possible). Merci pour cette recette !

★★ Hanoi Stars Hostel, Hanoi, Vietnam

★★ Hanoi Stars Hostel, Hanoi, Vietnam


Booking.com

Featuring free WiFi and a restaurant, Hanoi Stars Hostel offers accommodations in Hanoi.

Hanoi Restaurants - Where and What to Eat in Hanoi

Hanoi Restaurants - Where and What to Eat in Hanoi


vietnam-guide.com

Hanoi restaurants are plentiful and discovering its burgeoning culinary scene is the next best thing to do after a day of sightseeing and shopping. Found within Old Quarter’s narrow alleyways and bustling street markets, Chinese and French styles have mixed with Vietnam’s plentiful native crops and amazing

Socially Responsible Travel in Hanoi (Travel and Give Back to the Community)

by Sue Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

The phrase “socially responsible travel” is a new trend followed by travelers all over the world, in the context that traveling and experiencing new cultures is popular nowadays. Hanoi, renown for the chaotic Old Quarter, many little temples, Dong Xuan Market that sells household goods and street food, already has so much to offer. However, […]

The post Socially Responsible Travel in Hanoi (Travel and Give Back to the Community) appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Par : Frank

by Frank @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Bonsoir, je viens de découvrir ton site, et je te remercie de publier toutes ces recettes. je suis un "moit-moit" (français/vietnamien) et il y a quelques recettes que je désespérais de pouvoir faire un jour, depuis le décès de ma grand-mère. Grâce à ton site, je vais pouvoir refaire des banh cuon notamment, pour le bùn châ, nous avons encore en mémoire la recette de famille (qui diffère un peu de la tienne). Encore merci et continues s'il te plait !! Si tu as dans tes cartons la recette du porc mijoté séché n'hésites pas la recette de ma grand-mère a malheureusement disparu avec elle, et tous ceux qui y avaient gouté en sont tombés amoureux. La suite! La suite ! ;)

Bò tái chanh (recette vietnamienne de boeuf cru au citron)

by Miss Tâm @ La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Avec les beaux jours, voici un plat vietnamien rafraîchissant et simple que j’aime faire pour mes amis, le savoureux et parfumé Bò tái chanh, servi avec une bonne bière fraîche ! Désigné comme le carpaccio vietnamien, le Bò tái chanh … Lire la suite

Cet article Bò tái chanh (recette vietnamienne de boeuf cru au citron) est apparu en premier sur La kitchenette de Miss Tâm.

Bún Chả Hà Nội 26

Bún Chả Hà Nội 26


TNH

A very popular lunch restaurant serving the famous Hanoian lunch staple, Bún Chả (Hanoi Style Vermicelli with Grilled Pork).

Bar Bodega - Happy Hour and Lunch

by Kirk K @ mmm-yoso!!!

The Missus really wanted a change of pace; yes, Et Voila is on about every other week, though mostly for Happy Hour (I need to do an updated post), ditto Tribute Pizza. Our last couple of visits to Tiger Tiger...

Cách vẽ hoa hồng siêu đẹp trên bánh rau câu 3D

by admin @ Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Khi đã “nghiện” thạch rau câu 3D, hoa hồng là mẫu trang trí có sức thôi miên, khiến bạn không thể dừng kim để tiếp tục sáng tạo ra những bông hoa đẹp hơn. Khóa học gồm 15 bài giảng, hơn 3 giờ nội dung sẽ đưa bạn từ một cô gái chưa từng cầm […]

The post Cách vẽ hoa hồng siêu đẹp trên bánh rau câu 3D appeared first on Tâm Sự Gia Đình.

How to make Bun Cha-Ha Noi(Grilled Pork Noodle)

How to make Bun Cha-Ha Noi(Grilled Pork Noodle)


Paloma Cruises Official Website: Discounted Cruise Deals in Halong Bay

How to make Bun Cha-Ha Noi(Grilled Pork Noodle)

Bún Chả Hà Nội 26 - Lê Thánh Tôn ở TP. HCM

Bún Chả Hà Nội 26 - Lê Thánh Tôn ở TP. HCM


Foody

Bún Chả Hà Nội 26 - Quán ăn - Miền Bắc tại 8A/9C2 Thái Văn Lung, Quận 1, TP. HCM. Giá bình quân đầu người 30.000đ - 44.000đ

So, you're moving to Hanoi

by noreply@blogger.com (Tabitha) @ The City That Never Sleeps In

Thanks to this blog, which must successfully create the illusion that I know things about Vietnam, I've received all kinds of emails asking for advice over the last couple of years. Some of them I'm not well-equipped to answer - like, "Will my hair-straightener work in Vietnam?" - but for most I at least try to have a stab at an answer.

The most common type of email I receive is from someone moving to Hanoi, and who is looking for tips or advice on how to make the process easier and less overwhelming. I received an email like this the other day, which reminded me in many ways of the circumstances in which Nathan and I found ourselves in Hanoi. It went like this:

"Naturally, I am both very excited and unbelievably terrified. I know absolutely no Vietnamese, know nobody in the country except the name of my contacts, and am deferring medical school (a very straightforward/safe path) for the unknown despite not being naturally adventurous. I'm not running from anything or a natural free bird, as it were - it's a great opportunity and I want to force myself out of my safety bubble to learn something genuine."

Since this blog's retirement is imminent, I thought I should try to respond to this email here, in a last-ditch bid to be more useful to those who arrive in Hanoi, very excited and unbelievably terrified, in the future.

The email continues:

"I was wondering if you had any general advice about coming to Hanoi. I think my greatest concern is loneliness due to lack of language ability, relative youth (and traveling as a single woman without a partner, family, etc), so if you have any pointers in that realm that would be great. Also, because I have no idea where to live, if you have any advice there too (I've been told to come in a few days early, stay in a hotel, and look for a place from there, but any pre departure information would be appreciated, especially in terms of what I can expect)."

Funnily enough, I think loneliness should be the least of your concerns. Making friends in Hanoi is exceptionally easy. You'll start by knowing only your colleagues, but if you're sociable, you'll very quickly meet their friends too, and before long, friends of their friends. Young, educated Vietnamese people speak English and are eager to practice it, so not speaking Vietnamese is very little impediment to making Vietnamese friends - this is actually one of the reasons it's so easy to just give up on learning the language.

The expat community in Hanoi is small, and easy to infiltrate. There will be many other people just like you, young and single, and, just like you, looking to make friends - and fast. Everyone seems to organically develop friendship groups, but you can proactively boost your acquaintanceship by joining various clubs, sporting groups, attending all kinds of different events, or meeting up with people you know from the internet. For example, Nathan and I met two good friends of ours by joining their table at a trivia night event, and they themselves had only recently met, through a Couchsurfing group. We subsequently invited them to things, they invited us to things, cross-pollinating our friendship groups.

But of all the foreigners I've known in Hanoi, the ones who seem to have had the best time here are those who throw themselves wholeheartedly into their Vietnamese (as opposed to expat) friendship circle. It sounds like an obvious thing to do, but actually it can be hard. Amongst you there might be cultural and socio-economic differences, resulting in fundamentally different world-views; there might be different ideas about social norms and what is and isn't the "done thing"; there might be different ideas of simply what constitutes a good time. I definitely let my terror of potentially awkward social situations limit the kind of experiences I was open to, which I regret, because the Vietnamese friendships I did maintain are just so, so rewarding and wonderful, and who wouldn't want more of that? 

This brings me to the most important piece of advice I have about moving to Hanoi: Seize the opportunities it presents, using both hands, and your teeth too if necessary. This is not necessarily something you can really plan or prepare for, just be ready to recognise when it's happening - maybe when you least expect it - and then always say "yes".

I know engineers who've opened cafes; I know self-sworn singletons who've found lifelong love; I know people who came to teach English as an interim job and discovered that teaching is their passion; I know NGO-workers who sang on stage for the first time - as the star of the show no less; I know people who hated Vietnam during their first year, and now never want to leave.

If there are parts of your life here which are difficult - you might feel under-utilised at work, or you might miss home - Hanoi will always offer you another outlet to compensate for it. Take it. I had a friend who was deeply dissatisfied with her job, but started teaching swing dancing in the evenings to find some fulfilment. Last I heard, she was swing-dancing her way around Australia. Nathan and I are ourselves leaving Hanoi on a completely different - nay, better -  trajectory to that which landed us here. One we absolutely never could have predicted, and one that owes a lot to the opportunities which came our way since moving here. Nice one, Hanoi.

This is all very wishy-washy, I know. But for all the practical stuff, such as what to bring, and where to buy things, and how you find flatmates or a place to live, plus information on what clubs or groups you can join, it's all on The New Hanoian website, a Godsend for new arrivals. For events, there's the Hanoi Grapevine.

The only other thing I would add is regarding where to live. Something I've heard newcomers say a lot is how they want to live in a "Vietnamese neighbourhood". I totally get this desire for cultural integration, but actually, I think you'll find pretty much every neighbourhood in Hanoi will be "Vietnamese" enough for you, even the areas popular with expats. We live in a building that houses only foreigners, yet our neighbourhood is... well, you've read about it on this blog. You couldn't mistake it for being anywhere other than Hanoi. 

But what do I know anyway? I'll hand it over to The People. Is there anything you wish you knew before moving to Hanoi? Would you have done things any differently? Or do you just have a solid gold piece of practical advice for new arrivals?

Mine? Well, start a blog. Obviously.

Ma May Street

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

This street also is a union of two old streets. Hang May sold rattan products, and Hang Ma sold sacred joss (paper replicas of money, clothing, even stereo sets) to burn for the dead. Ma is burned in front of the altar of ancestors accompanied by prayers. Around the turn of the century, the streets...

Continue Reading

The post Ma May Street appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

Bún thang de Hanoi (une spécialité culinaire de Hanoi)

by Miss Tâm @ La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

La soupe bún thang, sophistiquée aux saveurs délicates, tient une place privilégiée dans le cœur des Hanoiens. Quand on évoque la gastronomie de Hanoi à l’étranger, on pense d’abord à la soupe pho parce que celle-ci a été largement diffusée … Lire la suite

Cet article Bún thang de Hanoi (une spécialité culinaire de Hanoi) est apparu en premier sur La kitchenette de Miss Tâm.

Bun Rieu from Phuong Nga 2

by Kirk K @ mmm-yoso!!!

I am forever indebted to all the folks who send me recommendations. In the comments section of my revisits post on Suppanee and Pho Xpress, "Elle" asked if I had tried the Bun Rieu at the newest location of Phuong...

Monument honors 1968 Spring Offensive heroes

by robert @ Talk Vietnam

The event gathered representatives of the HCM City authorities, families of the war martyrs, war veterans, and local residents. Huynh Van Chum, Vice Chairman of the municipal Party Committee’s Commission for Information and Education, recalled the fierce battle when 11 liberation soldiers fought hard to take control of the then Saigon Radio Station in the […]

26 Important Things To Know Before Your Vietnam Trip

26 Important Things To Know Before Your Vietnam Trip


Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

This blog features important Vietnam tips and tricks for first-timers. How to be street smart, travel safely, not being ripped off and have a blast!

Halte gourmande : Au café Lux, un Bo Bun de rêve !

by Miss Tâm @ La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Ouvert depuis le 18 septembre dans le quartier Saint-Maur / Oberkampf (Paris 11), le café Lux est un petit lieu convivial, sympa, sans chichis. Tenus par la belle et lumineuse Sophie (d’origine vietnamienne) et son mari Nicolas, ils misent sur … Lire la suite

Cet article Halte gourmande : Au café Lux, un Bo Bun de rêve ! est apparu en premier sur La kitchenette de Miss Tâm.

Hướng dẫn làm Bánh dứa Đài Loan truyền thống siêu ngon từ A-Z

by admin @ Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Khóa học Hướng dẫn làm bánh dứa Đài Loan sẽ giúp bạn nắm bắt và thành thục: Cách làm vỏ bánh dứa Đài Loan truyền thống Cách làm vỏ bánh phong cách đơn giản, tiện lợi và cực nhanh Cách làm vỏ bánh đặc biệt, giàu dinh dưỡng hơn và vỏ bánh dai hơn Cách […]

The post Hướng dẫn làm Bánh dứa Đài Loan truyền thống siêu ngon từ A-Z appeared first on Tâm Sự Gia Đình.

Bất ngờ với khả năng của Range Rover Sport PHEV

by robert @ Talk Vietnam

21:09 – 12/02/2018 (GMT+7) Đó chính là khả năng chinh phục cổng trời, đây là chiếc SUV đầu tiên trên thế giới chinh phục một trong những địa danh nổi tiếng nhất Trung Hoa, cổng trời núi Thiên Môn, tỉnh Hồ Nam. Đây là chiếc xe sử dụng động cơ xăng tích hợp động cơ […]

Goodbye

by noreply@blogger.com (Tabitha) @ The City That Never Sleeps In

Well, this is it. We have only a couple of days left in Hanoi.

Thank you to everyone who has followed The City That Never Sleeps In, and especially those who commented, or sent me emails, or approached me while I was taking the rubbish out, to say they enjoyed reading it. Keeping this blog has been one of the highlights from my time here.

I wrote this final post as a column for AsiaLife, but I’ve changed it slightly to reflect my changed feelings since I submitted it for publication. At that time I was a little nostalgic and dewy-eyed about leaving, but now, I’m just excited about the future. We leave Hanoi for a long holiday in Thailand, and then a new, quiet, life in Canberra - if there’s a city less like Hanoi in the world, I don’t know it. And for us, right now, that’s a good thing.

We’re leaving with some extra baggage too: our Uncle Ho portrait, our wedding ao dais, and a baby on the way (carry-on baggage). As we are told, constantly, the baby will be a Golden Dragon, a particularly lucky and lucrative kind of baby, of which there will be many, judging by the number of pregnant women waddling around in the Hanoi heat at the moment. It’s an incomparable farewell gift from our host nation, the endowment of lunar good fortune on our new family.

Thank you, Vietnam. But we know it’s time for us to leave. 

As I have mentioned before, because you know, it's on my mind day and night, the house over the road from us was knocked down. In the middle of the night. Using jackhammers. They’ve posted an artist’s image of the government office they’re building in its place, and it speaks a thousand words. Most of them swear words.

When Nathan and I saw that image of towering steel and glass, and landscaped gardens featuring strange 2D palm trees, we both just knew: we wouldn’t stick around to see those palm trees in 3D.

The thought of ceaseless jackhammering filled us with overwhelming dread. We knew it would be the straw that broke the camel’s back, if living in Vietnam was a camel.

Over the past couple of months, the cracks had already started to show. The honking seemed louder and more unnecessary; the pollution became unbearable; fruit vendors took on Machiavellian qualities; children stopped being cute, just loud.

But nothing about Vietnam had changed, only us.

After two-and-a-half years of enthusiastic ardour for Vietnam, I was cruising for a bruising. Maybe it was a self-fulfilling prophecy, because I’d always said we should leave before three years is up, but I think it’s more just the expiry of the statute of limitations on Keeping Your Shit Together.

Living as an expat in Vietnam isn’t hard, but it isn’t always easy.  While, yes, you can drink out of coconuts and get cheap pedicures, it’s also loud, crowded and polluted. And some vegetables are grown in human poo.

It always has been that way, and I’ve always known that. But to thoroughly enjoy Vietnam’s many, many upsides, I’ve had to not let the downsides get to me. And I’ve done this through a constant practice of Keeping My Shit Together: focusing on the positive, being curious rather than judgemental, being dazzled, not frazzled.

Keeping Your Shit Together is an active process, and over time, it’s tiring. Once you begin to falter, it easily spirals into Losing Your Shit. You don’t look at your beer and think, glory be to God for cheap beer; you think, this beer is probably laced with formaldehyde. You give the stink eye to children with those squeaky shoes. You see a dog and you say to it, “They’re going to eat you”.  You look at an artist’s image for a new building and you don’t feel impressed by Vietnam’s unstoppable march towards modernisation, you just think, that building is going to be the end of me. And then you tread on a used sanitary napkin and that pretty much seals the deal.

One of the hardest things about being an expat in Vietnam is listening to the whinging of embittered expats - who’ve Lost Their Shit - who act as if they’re serving time here against their will. Their bad juju is catching, kryptonite to anyone fiercely, and rightly, Keeping Their Shit Together.

I don’t want to be one of them. I’m going to accept that in this break-up, it’s not Vietnam, it’s me, and I’m going to get out of here before I bring anyone else down with me.

I leave Vietnam with no regrets. I loved living here; it has been one of the greatest experiences of my life. It has given me so much - so many memories, and opportunities, and friends and life lessons - and asked for not much more in return than just Keeping My Shit Together. I definitely did better out of that deal.

But now, I’m just ready to go home. 

Thank you to you all. Try to Keep Your Shit Together,
Tabitha x

Hanoi police seize 7,500 meth pills during drug bust

by robert @ Uncategorized – Talk Vietnam

Officers also seized an undisclosed amount of cash and other drug paraphernalia. The Hanoi police said the department is making progress in the ongoing battle against serious drugs into the capital city. Pham Van Hung, a resident of Binh Phuoc now faces charges of possession illegal narcotic substances with intent to traffic and possession of […]

Hanoi Style Salmon with Turmeric and Dill

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

Cha Ca Thanh Long is one of our favorite Vietnamese dishes and we’ve already wrote about it here, but this time we’re back with similar recipe but a slight twist. Traditionally this dish is made in small portions with cut filet of snakehead or catfish cooked table side or on a sizzling fajita style pan, […]

Bangkok’s Chatuchak Market is Going Cashless this June

by Lydia Lee @ TripZilla Magazine

Tự tay làm 1001 loại son tuyệt đẹp ngay tại nhà

by admin @ Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Như đại minh tinh Elizabeth Taylor đã từng nói: “Tự rót cho mình một ly, thoa một chút son môi và trở nên bình thản” đủ để thấy, son môi quan trọng với phụ nữ như thế nào và chắc hẳn, trong túi của mỗi cô gái, đều có 2-3 thỏi son để đổi màu. Thế nhưng, […]

The post Tự tay làm 1001 loại son tuyệt đẹp ngay tại nhà appeared first on Tâm Sự Gia Đình.

Par : Miss Tâm

by Miss Tâm @ Commentaires sur : Bun Cha, vermicelles de riz au porc grillé de Hanoï (Bún Chả Hà Nội)

Merci de ta visite ! J'espère que le bun cha t'a plu ainsi qu'à ta petite famille. Belle semaine à toi.

Commentaires sur Bo Bun (Vermicelles de riz au boeuf sauté) ou Bò bún / Bún bò nam bộ par Nguyen emeline

by Nguyen emeline @ Commentaires pour La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Bonjour Miss Tam! Pr mon anniversaire, j'ai invité 15 personnes à manger et j'ai choisi de faire un bo bun! votre recette sur internet semblait la plus intéressante! et effectivement c'était délicieux! je n'ai pas eu de soucis à la faire, car c'est très précis. Merci ! J'ai diminué simplement les doses de viande car ns ne sommes pas trop des viandards et cela suffisait largement! Je suis métisse franco-viet, mais mon père ne m'a jamais appris à cuisiner viet, donc, je connais peu de choses! c'est chouette d'avoir accès à la tradition culinaire via ton site! La prochaine fois je ferais un pho! à bientot!

ブンチャーハノイ26(Bun Cha Ha Noi 26) - ホーチミン市1区の飲食・レストラン/ベトナム料理 | スポットデータベース | ベトナム生活・観光情報ナビ[ベトナビ]

ブンチャーハノイ26(Bun Cha Ha Noi 26) - ホーチミン市1区の飲食・レストラン/ベトナム料理 | スポットデータベース | ベトナム生活・観光情報ナビ[ベトナビ]


ベトナム生活・観光情報ナビ[ベトナビ]

ブンチャーハノイ26(Bun Cha Ha Noi 26) - ホーチミン市1区の飲食・レストラン/ベトナム料理の詳細。 | 観光地、抑えておきたい有名店から隠れた名店などベトナムのお店、レストラン、カフェ、スパなどのベトナムスポットのデータベースです。

Party chief receives French Ambassador

by robert @ Talk Vietnam

Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong (R) receives French Ambassador Bertrand Lortholary. (Photo: VNA) Hanoi (VNA) – General Secretary of the Communist Party of Vietnam Nguyen Phu Trong hosted French Ambassador Bertrand Lortholary in Hanoi on February 12, affirming that Vietnam wants to further promote friendship and cooperation with France in the coming time. The […]

Bún riêu cua (soupe de vermicelles de riz au crabe revisitée)

by Miss Tâm @ La kitchenette de Miss Tâm

Dans le cœur des Vietnamiens, certains plats populaires lui sont particulièrement chers. Parmi ceux-là, le bún riêu cua, une merveilleuse soupe de vermicelles de riz (bún) légèrement acide (riêu) au crabe (cua), est apprécié de tous pour la saveur fine et exquise … Lire la suite

Cet article Bún riêu cua (soupe de vermicelles de riz au crabe revisitée) est apparu en premier sur La kitchenette de Miss Tâm.

Bun Cha for Breakfast

Bun Cha for Breakfast


SAVEUR

Some people have weekend morning pancake rituals. I have bun cha. You might think it's odd to begin the day with a plate full of grilled pork patties, fresh greens, and rice noodles. But if you do, you probably haven't lived in Hanoi, where, along with pho, it reigns as the city's signature dish. Keep reading »

Hanoi Old Quarter

by thanhnguyen @ Rising Dragon Palace Hotel

There’s an old Vietnamese saying, “Hanoi has thirty-six streets and guilds – Jam Street, Sugar Street, Salt Street…”. Inside a modern and dynamic city, there appears an antique quarter, the Hanoi’s Old Quarter – the represented eternal soul of the city. These days, most Vietnamese and Westerners are familiar with the phrase “Hà Nội –...

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The post Hanoi Old Quarter appeared first on Rising Dragon Palace Hotel.

Hướng dẫn làm bánh rau câu kem bơ tuyệt đẹp – không cần biết vẽ

by admin @ Tâm Sự Gia Đình

Rau câu đi kèm với kem bơ – sự kết hợp hoàn hảo, độc đáo và lại cực kỳ ăn nhập sẽ mang tới cho bạn những trải nghiệm thật vui và ngọt ngào. Chắc hẳn bạn không còn lạ lẫm gì với bánh thạch rau câu hay những chiếc bánh kem bơ trang trí […]

The post Hướng dẫn làm bánh rau câu kem bơ tuyệt đẹp – không cần biết vẽ appeared first on Tâm Sự Gia Đình.

Fear and self-loathing in expat land

by noreply@blogger.com (Tabitha) @ The City That Never Sleeps In


This post first appeared on Crikey, and features a couple of observations from previous blog posts. Sorry for the rehash - I hope to post properly soon!
----
To the Vietnamese who live around me, it’s clear where I fit in here: I don’t. The differences between us are as plain as the enormous nose on my big fat face.
In Vietnam, I am, and always will be, a Tây.
I can hear the call of “Tây-Tây-Tây-Tây-Tây” in any market as vendors announce my presence to each other, making it pretty much synonymous with the sound effect “ker-CHING!”
I’m not offended one bit by this label. Not even when I had new passport photos taken and the shop filled in the “Mr/Ms_________” section on the little receipt with “Ms Tây”, and filed it away under T.
Because I am a Tây. Even if they would let me, I would never try to pretend to the Vietnamese that I’m just like them.
However, before I moved here, I envisioned making for myself a perfectly authentic, local Vietnamese life. I was sure I would assimilate beautifully. I was very much the kind of person who would travel to Asia and scoff at tourists eating pizza. “What’s the point of even coming overseas if you’re just doing what you do at home, eh?” I would say, indignant and unbearable.
Now, my favourite café in Hanoi is run by a Melbournian and serves soy chai lattes. I like Vietnamese coffee very much, and drink it often. But you know what I like more? Soy chai lattes.
I don’t care any more about my street cred or my authenticity, or being pleased with myself for being the only foreigner in a local coffee shop. That soy chai latte doesn’t lessen the Vietnam-ness of my life here; in fact, it makes it better, offering me enough comforting familiarity to better enjoy the rest of my very Hanoian day.
When visitors from Australia ask me to take them to my favourite cafe in Hanoi, I know better than to take them to this place, my real favourite café. The one and only visitor I’ve taken there looked around and said, “Hmm, there sure are a lot of foreigners in here”, and there was judgement in them there italics.
To me, this is like going to a Chinese restaurant in Sydney’s Chinatown and complaining, “Hmm, there sure are a lot of Chinese people in here”.
The formation of communities with shared ethnicities and cultures is the most natural thing in the world. Liberal-minded, politically correct, cultural relativists like myself love them for bringing “diversity” and “colour” to our neighbourhoods. Yet those of us who move overseas seem to think we’re above needing the familiarity of such communities ourselves. We’re sure we’ll just slot right in to our new home because we’re so open-minded and adaptable.
No, we won’t become your typical "expat". Now, there’s another word with its own synonymous sound effect: one of retching.
“Expat” conjures up two stereotypes, both of them unseemly: one clad in white linen, drinking gins and tonic, and oppressing the natives; the other sunburnt, overweight, subsisting entirely on baked beans and whinging about the locals. Both images emphasise that the expat is stubbornly, wilfully, unassimilated.
It’s a word with such awful colonial overtones. All at once it projects cultural superiority and barbarism. And for a word which is supposed to be all about someone moving to a new and different country, all it does it emphasise where they’ve come from: it seems you’re only an expat if you’re from the developed world, otherwise, let’s face it, you’re an immigrant.
It’s because of these connotations that people, like me, try to dodge the dreaded expat label. But despite my best intentions, I have become just another expat. I might not have a white linen suit, but I’m still a Tây who hangs out with other Tâys and does your typical Tây things.
So every one of my soy chai lattes could taste just like self-loathing, or I could just get over myself and own it: I’m an expat. I’ll still say it with teeth gritted against all those historical connotations, but I’ll say it: I am an expat.

What image problem?

by noreply@blogger.com (Tabitha) @ The City That Never Sleeps In

A little while back, the Huffingpost Post published a piece by Matt Kepnes called “Why I’ll never return to Vietnam” which criticised Vietnam for being nothing more than a land of scam artists and rip-off merchants. 

Whether or not you agree with Kepnes (and for the record, I don’t, but that’s a post for another time), you can’t deny that the article caused quite a stir in Vietnam. Unsurprising for a country where the burgeoning tourism industry is a considerable source of national pride, and more importantly, income. 

It generated around 900 comments on the HuffPo site, many from irate Vietnamese readers, and prompted a flurry of articles and opinion pieces in the Vietnamese press. One of my favourites refers to the Huffington Post as being “mistaken” for a “prominent newspaper”, and then calls Kepnes “a self-proclaimed Dave Matthews Band super fan”. Ouch.

But the most interesting response appeared on the news site for Voice of Vietnam, the state-run national radio station and mouthpiece for the Communist Party.

Entitled “I am a real backpacker”, the article profiles an Australian backpacker named Thomas Johnson “whose back always carries a big bag full of things he bought from different shops in the capital city”. 

Thomas tells the reporter that he finds Hanoi “really comfortable, with a stable work environment and friendly people”. He loves the food, and he’s enjoyed all the places he’s visited, like the ceramics village, the silk village and the flower village. 

“’Wherever I go, I am always tempted by special hand-made products, such as Ao dai (Vietnamese women’s traditional dress), conical hats, ceramics and other handicrafts. That is the reason why my backpack is always heavy with a lot of things,’ he said with a smile.”

So, he’s a young, Australian, male backpacker who just can’t get enough of flowers, silk, handicrafts and women’s dresses. He’s just cramming them all into his “bag full of things”. 

In closing, the article makes it very clear that Thomas, unlike Matt Kepnes, will be coming back to Vietnam:

“The Australian visitor said he would come back to Vietnam as soon as possible to enjoy the hidden charms of the S-shaped country, and his next destination would be Ho Chi Minh City. “I’ve heard a lot about the great leader of Vietnam and wish to visit the city named after him to explore the southern part of Vietnam,” he said.”

Wow, Thomas. A state-owned mouthpiece for the Communist Party could not have said it better themselves.

I’m going to put it out there and suggest that maybe Thomas isn’t, you know, a real person. You see, you can write an article called “I am a real backpacker” but that doesn’t actually make the backpacker real.

But really, who better to respond to criticism that your country is filled with cheats and scam artists than a person you just completely made up? Tourists will surely now be flocking to Vietnam, voted Number 1 most ironic country in southeast Asia.    


The Most Complete Travel Guide to Pico Island, Azores

by Bruno B. @ Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

This easy-to-follow Pico travel guide contains all you need to know to explore Pico island in Azores. Find out the best places to go and how to budget and plan your itinerary. And of course, what and where to eat. Let’s get started! Each island in the Azores has its own charm and appeal. There’s […]

The post The Most Complete Travel Guide to Pico Island, Azores appeared first on Geeky Explorer | Travel smart. Travel smart!

Using a Smartphone Camera Lens Kit To Boost Your Photos: Pixter Review

by Bruno B. @ Geeky Explorer | Travel smart

Looking for a clever, effective and inexpensive way to boost your photos on your smartphone? Pixter might be the answer you’re looking for. This is a detailed review on of their attachable smartphone camera lens: the Super Fisheye! I confess I had a bit of prejudice against smartphone accessories. It’s just that I’ve seen so […]

The post Using a Smartphone Camera Lens Kit To Boost Your Photos: Pixter Review appeared first on Geeky Explorer | Travel smart. Travel smart!

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